RON CHIRONNA: Illustrator-Teaching Artist

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Sample Unit Plan

Teaching Artist Page

Teaching Artist: Ronald Chironna

E-mail: ronald.chironna@gmail.com

Phone: 718-720-6142

 

CAE Program: Parents as Arts Partners

School/Borough: PS 69R / Staten Island Room: 108D

Residency Dates: 04/11/2013, 04/18/2013, 04/25/2013, 05/02/2013, 05/09/2013

Number of Sessions: 5

Discipline: Visual Arts/Literacy

Teacher(s): Linda Sorrentino, Margaret Goodman

Grade Level: Autism Population/ possibly K through 5

SNAPSHOT

Each of the five classes will involve a different art medium: 1)collage, 2)wood construction, 3)paint, 4)clay, and 5) puppetry. The Introduction phase of the lesson will begin with the reading of a book (read aloud by teaching artist and/or student and/or parent) that includes illustrations executed in the same medium, and involving the same subject matter, as the medium and subject used that day in the art activity. Examples of fine art will also be shown and discussed during the introduction. A demonstration of the art activity will lead into the activity by the class participants. The reflection part of the lesson will involve the participants, verbally and in written form (as much as each child with autism is able, and with the parent’s aid), describing the activity, their reaction to it, and their knowledge of the subject of their artistic creation.

 

STANDARDS

(The following standards apply to a general education population. The degree to which they apply to students with autism can only be determined by someone with more expertise in this area.)

Students should be working toward meeting the following 2nd grade benchmarks according to the Blueprint for Visual Arts to create collages that demonstrate experimentation with:

-- Placement of shapes

-- Color

-- Cut and torn paper

-- Composition

-- Layering

-- Developing visual arts vocabulary

-- Looking at and discussing art

Students should be working toward meeting the following 2nd grade benchmarks according to the Blueprint for Visual Arts to create wood constructions that demonstrate experimentation with:

-- Composition

-- Three -dimensional (art that sticks out in space) versus two- dimensional (art that is flat)

-- Stacking and balance

-- Developing visual arts vocabulary

-- Looking at and discussing art

-- Careers in art

-- Cultural institutions

-- Public art

Students should be working toward meeting the following 2nd grade benchmarks according to the Blueprint for Visual Arts to create paintings that demonstrate experimentation with:

-- Personal observations about a person

-- Control of paint media and brushes

-- Basic organization of space

-- Experimentation with mixing colors

-- Developing visual arts vocabulary

-- Looking at and discussing art

-- Interpreting self

-- Use of varied line

Students should be working toward meeting the following 2nd grade benchmarks according to the Blueprint for Visual Arts to create sculptures that demonstrate experimentation with:

-- Techniques such as pinching and coiling

-- Texture

-- Additive and subtractive techniques

-- Developing visual arts vocabulary

-- Looking at and discussing art

-- Careers in art

-- Recognizing cultural and utilitarian significance of art (pottery, tiles, etc.)

Students should be working toward meeting the 2nd grade benchmarks according to the Blueprint for Visual Arts to create puppets that demonstrate experimentation with skills gained in all previous lessons.

 

Foundational Experiences in Art Support Developmental Goals and Common Core Learning

Through art (making, looking, and sharing) students…

-- Create unique works of art that reflect personal choices, emotions, interests, and ideas. Individual discoveries are encouraged and valued.

-- Experiment with color, shape, line, and texture to create expressive and symbolic images.

-- Explore a variety of art materials and experiment with multiple art processes. Discover multiple pathways to success.

-- Investigate their visual world, making observations about themselves, their families, and their communities. Students create artwork from observation, their memories, and imagination.

-- Learn to work through challenges related to materials, processes, and planning in a supportive environment where there are no wrong answers.

-- Create artwork that requires students to use their hands as tools to manipulate a wide variety of art materials.

-- Share and describe their own artwork and experiences with peers, teachers, and parents through guided discussion and close-looking. Develop a basic understanding of space as they experiment with two and three-dimensional compositions.

-- Discover new words grounded in concrete sensory and kinesthetic experiences and use new vocabulary when communicating ideas and feelings about their artwork and process.

-- Explore and respond to exemplary works of art, picture books, and to their own artwork through small and large group discussions. Learn to share materials and space while creating and sharing artwork.

 

Common Core and General Developmental Goals:

-- Build and value a student’s own unique sense of self and identity.

-- Discover ways of communicating ideas and emotions.

-- Identify different ways to solve authentic concrete problems and understand cause and effect.

-- Analyze and respond to their world.

-- Learn to engage and persist in new tasks with curiosity and confidence.

-- Increase fine motor skills.

-- Analyze images for informational details; explore similarities, differences, and details.

-- Build vocabulary and encourage accountable talk.

-- Develop social skills and learn to respect other children’s artwork and individual points of view.

 

New York State Learning Standards

Visual Arts:

1. Students will make works of art that explore different kinds of subject matter, topics, themes, and metaphors. Students will understand and use sensory elements, organizational principles, and expressive images to communicate their own ideas in works of art. Students will use a variety of art materials, processes, mediums, and techniques, and use appropriate technologies for creating and exhibiting visual art works.

2. Students will know and use a variety of visual arts materials, techniques, and processes. Students will know about resources and opportunities for participation in visual arts in the community (exhibitions, libraries, museums, galleries) and use appropriate materials (art reproductions, slides, print materials, electronic media). Students will be aware of vocational options available in the visual arts.

English Language Arts:

1: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for information and understanding. As listeners and readers, students will collect data, facts, and ideas; discover relationships, concepts, and generalizations; and use knowledge generated from oral, written, and electronically produced texts. As speakers and writers, they will use oral and written language to acquire, interpret, apply, and transmit information.

2: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for literary response and expression. Students will read and listen to oral, written, and electronically produced texts and performances, relate texts and performances to their own lives, and develop an understanding of the diverse social, historical, and cultural dimensions the texts and performances represent. As speakers and writers, students will use oral and written language for self-expression and artistic creation.

3: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for critical analysis and evaluation. As listeners and readers, students will analyze experiences, ideas, information, and issues presented by others using a variety of established criteria. As speakers and writers, they will present, in oral and written language and from a variety of perspectives, their opinions and judgments on experiences, ideas, information and issues.

4: Students will read, write, listen, and speak for social interaction. Students will use oral and written language for effective social communication with a wide variety of people. As readers and listeners, they will use the social communications of others to enrich their understanding of people and their views.

 

PARTNERING TEACHERS’ GOALS

"We would love to be able to incorporate literature and books with the arts. We are most probably going to target our autistic population in grades 1-5. Hands-on activities would be best. We will send home letters, hang posters, and make phone calls to encourage parent participation." (as stated in the PS 69R application.) In addition, because parent participation in school activities is so poor, PS 69 is hoping that this program will galvanize parents to investigate the other programs the school offers their children and themselves.

 

ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S)

-- How do people express themselves through art today?

-- How do they use their personal experiences to create art?

-- What art materials can they use?

-- What art careers are available to all of us?

-- How do we experience visual art as viewers?

-- What is artistic collaboration?

-- What is a collage?

-- How can we use collage to depict a subject of our choice?

-- What skills and processes do we use when making a collage?

-- Why did we pick that particular animal to depict in our collage?

-- What do we know about the animal we depicted?

-- What is two-dimensionality and three-dimensionality, and how are they different?

-- How do we think differently when making a three-dimensional piece of art?

-- What is balance?

-- What is sculpture?

-- How does line and shape exist in space?

-- What is a portrait? What is a self-portrait?

-- How can we use close observation skills to help us create a better work of art?

-- What visual clues and details help identify the person we’re portraying in a painting?

-- How does our choice of color and technique affect the mood, tone, or interpretation of a painting?

-- How do we mix colors?

-- How do we use paint and the tools of painting?

-- What is clay? Where does it come from?

-- What are the skills and techniques needed to produce a creative clay piece?

-- What kinds of forms can we make with clay?

-- How has clay been used throughout history?

-- What is a puppet?

-- What are the various kinds of puppets?

-- What is the history of puppetry?

-- Why do we use puppets for storytelling?

-- How do I reflect upon, describe, and make meaning of theatre and puppetry?

-- What skills and vocabulary do I need to create and appreciate puppetry?

-- How do puppeteers create mood or feelings?

-- What materials can we use to make puppets?

-- What is a shadow puppet?

-- How can we work together to put on a puppet show?

-- How does manipulation of a puppet affect the performance?

 

OUTCOMES

Students will understand/know: 

-- Artists experiment with compositional elements.

-- Artists use various materials and tools to make their artwork.

-- Artists explore art materials and practice techniques.

-- Artists make aesthetic decisions.

-- Artists use their imagination.

-- Artists describe what they do verbally and in written form.

-- Artists can change shapes in art from one form to another.

-- The technique of cutting paper with a scissors.

-- The definition of collage and how to create one.

-- Animals live in their own unique environments.

-- Artists can create animal collages with paper and glue.

-- Artists create two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.

-- Artists can use wood and glue to create three-dimensional art.

-- Artists use paint to create artistic compositions.

-- Artists use paint to depict themselves and other people.

-- The definition of portrait and self-portrait.

-- Clay is a natural material that comes from the earth.

-- Clay is malleable when moist.

-- Clay can be transformed into various shapes.

-- Monster face tiles can be created using clay and tools that make impressions in clay.

-- Artists work collaboratively.

-- Artists can use various materials to create puppets.

-- Art can be used in fun applications for entertainment purposes.

-- Artists can use puppets to perform a show.

Students will be able to:

-- Make observations about works of art and resource books.

-- Discuss and evaluate their own artwork and their classmates’ artwork.

-- Describe their artwork and art process verbally and in written form.

-- Define and describe what a collage is.

-- Tear and cut paper into a variety of shapes.

-- Arrange shapes into a composition.

-- Layer shapes.

-- Use glue to attach their shapes to a background paper.

-- Choose an animal and its environment for the subject of their collage.

-- Demonstrate three-dimensionality using wood pieces.

-- Manipulate wood pieces so that they stand up, stack, and balance.

-- Arrange wood pieces into a composition, and glue them to make the composition permanent.

-- Control paint media and brushes.

-- Create lines, shapes, and compositions with paint.

-- Mix colors to create new colors.

-- Clean their brushes using water and/or paper towels.

-- Use their hands to change clay: stretch, press, pull, pinch, poke, roll, flatten, add, and subtract.

-- Create 3-D clay forms of various kinds.

-- Create a puppet character using pencil on heavy stock paper.

-- Cut out the puppet characters with a scissors.

-- Cut the characters into two or more pieces, making joints.

-- Reassemble the characters using hole punchers and metal brads.

-- Add sticks to the puppets, so they can use their hands to make the puppets move.

-- Participate in a puppet show.

 

VOCABULARY (possible choices)

Hands as tools, collage, choice, create, different, similar, shape, tear, pinch, rough edge, smooth edge, scissors, cut, rounded shapes, sharp shapes, larger, smaller, colors, glue, tap-tap, spread-spread, press-press, underneath, on-top, above, below, next-to, overlap, texture, bumpy, rough, smooth, compose, experiment, details, stand-up, wood, sculpture, construct, build, stack, balance, lean, tall, short, wide, different sides, inside space, outside space, support, base, wood glue, turn (turn your sculpture to see it from different angles), sticks out into space (3D), flat like paper (2D), paint, paintbrush, thick brush, thin brush, different types of descriptive words for lines, primary colors, secondary colors, shapes made with lines, spread, outline, mix, blend, portrait, self-portrait, skin color, tint, features of the face, clay, moist, dry, different ways of using hands as tools (pinch, pull, twist, press, roll, coil, poke, attach, smooth (use pointer finger to smooth and attach), add (put on more clay), subtract (take away clay), make clay stand-up, base, foot for clay to stand on, support, pottery, pinch pot, tile, clay tools, scratch, character, puppet, joints, metal brads, disassemble, reassemble, sticks, pretend, descriptive details, animate, voice, perform, present, play, background, back-drop, story telling, black, shadow puppet, screen, and light source.

 

UNIT PLAN

Lesson #1 Animal Collages

-- Outcomes:

Students will be able to:

-- Define and describe what a collage is.

-- Tear and cut paper into a variety of shapes.

-- Arrange shapes into an animal composition.

-- Think, speak, and write about an animal and its habitat.

-- Layer shapes.

-- Discuss and evaluate their own collages and their classmates’ collages. 

-- Make observations about works of art and book resources.

Students will understand:

-- The definition of a collage.

-- The techniques for creating a collage.

-- The vocabulary of collage making.

-- Animals look and act differently, and live in different environments.

-- Artists experiment with compositional elements.

-- Artists make choices about materials, processes, and skills.

-- Artists make aesthetic decisions.

-- Artists describe what they do verbally and in written form.

-- Questions:

-- What are lines and shapes?

-- How can we use our knowledge of lines and shapes to create a collage composition?

-- What materials and techniques can we use to make a collage?

-- What kind of choices can we make about color and shape, and artistic processes and skills, when making a collage?

-- How can we use our observation of the world around us and of other artists’ work in order to gain knowledge that will help us create a color animal collage?

-- What do we know about the animals we’ve chosen to depict in our collages?

-- How can we write a report using that knowledge?

-- Activities:

-- Have students practice tearing paper, cutting paper with a scissors, and gluing paper to a background paper.

-- Allow students time to think about an animal and its habitat, what shapes they want to make to create the animal, and where they want to place those shapes on the background paper.

-- Students can choose their background paper color to match the habitat of their chosen animal.

-- Instruct students to tear, cut, and compose colored papers to collage the basic shape of an animal.

-- Instruct students to tear, cut, and compose colored papers to collage the background and their animal’s details.

-- Hand out glue when students have made their shapes and are ready to finalize their collage.

-- Ask students to write a short report documenting the process of creating their collage, and describing what they know about the animal they depicted.

-- Documentation/Assessment:

-- Have students share their artwork with each other.

-- Conduct a peaceful discussion of the lesson, with students assessing themselves on the process of how they made their collages, and how they depicted their animal and its habitat.

-- Use accountable talk; backed up by evidence, facts, reasons.

-- Use informal student reflection, and responses to their experimentation with the materials and processes.

-- Observe students’ work-in-progress.

o How are they tearing and cutting the paper?

o Are they choosing colors that make sense for their animal and its environment?

-- Question students during independent work.

-- Observe class discussions.

-- Review completed work.

-- Ask students:

o What animals they made.

o How they created their artwork.

o What choices they made.

o If it was difficult to do.

 

Lesson #2 Wood Constructions

-- Outcomes:

Students will be able to:

-- Demonstrate three-dimensionality using wood pieces.

-- Manipulate the wood pieces so that they stand up, stack, and balance.

-- Arrange wood pieces into a composition.

-- Use that composition to depict a recognizable object (house, car, boat, etc.).

-- Glue wood pieces to make a permanent composition.

-- Make observations about works of art and resource books.

Students will understand:

-- Artists create two-dimensional and three-dimensional art.

-- The techniques and vocabulary for creating three-dimensional constructions.

-- Artists use practiced techniques and tools to create constructions.

-- Artists can depict facsimiles of real three-dimensional objects using art materials.

-- Questions:

-- How can we use wood pieces to demonstrate three-dimensionality?

-- How can we use wood pieces to demonstrate the concept of balance?

-- What kinds of objects can we depict using wood pieces?

-- What is positive space and negative space?

-- How do we look at artwork that is three-dimensional differently than we look at two-dimensional art?

-- Activities:

-- Direct students to choose an agreed upon number of wood pieces (8 to 10?).

-- Instruct students to try different ways of stacking and balancing the wood pieces on the board bases.

-- Ask students to think about what they are attempting to depict using their wood pieces.

-- Give out wood glue when students are ready to make their constructions permanent.

-- Make a second or third construction, different than the first one.

-- Ask students to write a short report documenting the process of creating their construction, and describing what they know about the object they depicted.

-- Documentation/Assessment:

-- Have students share their artwork with each other.

-- Conduct a peaceful discussion of the lesson, with students assessing themselves on the process of how they made their constructions, and how they depicted their three-dimensional object.

-- Use accountable talk; backed up by evidence, facts, reasons.

-- Use informal student reflection, and responses to their experimentation with the materials and processes.

-- Observe students’ work-in-progress.

o Are they able to stack, balance, and glue their wood pieces successfully?

o Are they choosing wood shapes that make sense for the object they are depicting?

-- Question students during independent work.

-- Observe class discussions.

-- Review completed work.

-- Ask students:

o What kind of construction did they make.

o How they created their artwork.

o What choices they made.

o If it was difficult to do.

 

Lesson #3 Painting Portraits

-- Outcomes:

Students will be able to:

-- Control paint media and brushes.

-- Clean their brushes using paper towels.

-- Create line and shape compositions with tempera paint.

-- Mix primary colors to create secondary colors.

-- Add black to a color to make a shade, and white to a color to make a tint.

-- Make browns and skin tones.

-- Make skin tones using expressive colors rather than realistic colors.

-- Observe and identify facial characteristics and details.

-- Paint a portrait or self-portrait.

-- Make observations about works of art and resource books.

Students will understand:

-- Artists use practiced techniques and tools to create paintings.

-- Lines are made up of a series of dots.

-- Shapes are made from lines that connect end to end.

-- Artists mix colors to create new colors.

-- Mixing primary colors results in secondary colors.

-- Adding black to a color creates a shade.

-- Adding white to a color creates a tint.

-- How to create browns and skin tones.

-- The meaning of portrait and self-portrait.

-- Questions:

-- How do we use paints and paint brushes?

-- How can we use paint to explore lines and shapes?

-- How can we use primary colors to make secondary colors?

-- How can we use black and white paint to create shades and tints?

-- How do we make browns and skin tones using the colors available to us?

-- How do we paint a portrait or self-portrait?

-- What visual cues and details should we include in our portrait or self-portrait painting?

-- How can we paint from observation, memory, or imagination?

-- Activities:

-- Direct students to carefully paint various kinds of lines and shapes with colors of their choice.

-- Ask students to vary the lines, use the entire sheet of paper, overlap, leave big and small spaces of white paper, and have the lines touch the edges of the paper.

-- Instruct students to mix the primary colors on their paper to discover what secondary colors result.

-- Have them add white to a color to create a tint, and black to a color to create a shade.

-- Demonstrate how to create browns and skin tones, and have the students try it on their own.

-- Ask students to create a portrait of a person they can observe, or a portrait or self-portrait from memory.

-- Ask students to write a short report documenting the process of creating their painting, and describing what they know about the person they depicted.

-- Documentation/Assessment:

-- Have students share their artwork with each other.

-- Conduct a peaceful discussion of the lesson, with students assessing themselves on the process of how they made their paintings, and how they depicted the person who was the subject of their painting.

-- Use accountable talk; backed up by evidence, facts, reasons.

-- Use informal student reflection, and responses to their experimentation with the materials and processes.

-- Observe students’ work-in-progress.

o Were they able to paint lines and shapes successfully?

o Did they understand how to create secondary colors from primary colors?

o Were students able to mix their paints to create browns and skin tones?

o Did they understand the concept of portrait and self-portrait and were they able to execute one or the other?

-- Question students during independent work.

-- Observe class discussions.

-- Review completed work.

-- Ask students:

o Who their portrait subject was.

o How they mixed their colors.

o The steps in creating their artwork.

o What choices they made.

o If it was difficult to do.

 

Lesson #4 Clay Monster Tiles

-- Outcomes:

Students will be able to:

-- Use their hands to change clay: stretch, press, pull, pinch, poke, roll, flatten, add, and subtract.

-- Create 3-D clay forms of various kinds.

-- Use clay-working techniques and tools to sculpt their clay.

-- Make textures on the clay’s surface.

-- Create monster face relief tiles.

-- Make observations about works of art and resource books.

Students will understand:

-- Clay is a natural material that comes from the earth.

-- Clay is malleable when moist.

-- Clay can be transformed into various shapes.

-- Clay can be manipulated using hands and tools.

-- Clay is soft when moist and hard when dry.

-- The significance of clay objects throughout history.

-- Questions:

-- What is clay?

-- Where does clay come from?

-- How does clay change from moist and soft to dry and hard?

-- What can we do with clay?

-- What art techniques are associated with the creation of clay forms?

-- How many different kinds of forms can we create with clay?

-- What tools can we use to manipulate clay?

-- How can we create specific objects (pots, animal forms, human forms) using clay?

-- How can we create tiles with monster faces using clay?

-- Activities:

-- Invite students to share their experiences with clay.

-- Talk about where clay comes from (natural vs. man-made--clay deposits are found in the earth near streams, rivers and seas) and how different people all over the world use it and have for centuries.

-- Pass around or show hardened clay objects.

-- Cut and distribute clay to each student, and ask:

o what do you notice? smell, temperature, weight, wet, dry etc.

o how is it different from the sculpture that was passed around?

o how can you change its shape?

-- Direct students to pinch, poke, roll, pull, and press the clay.

-- Students can take this time to explore the clay on their own.

-- Students sitting at the same table can be invited to combine their clay explorations and build a single form.

-- Ask students to share the forms they made and explain how they manipulated their piece of clay.

-- Show the students how to make beads, and puncture them to slide onto the pipe cleaner, in order to make a necklace.

-- Demonstrate and direct students to make a pinchpot or animal, stressing adding and subtracting clay when making the animal.

-- Direct students to make a monster face tile; stress adding and subtracting clay when making the sculpture.

-- Ask students to start their monster faces on masonite boards by flattening out and trimming the clay to the shape they want, and then transferring the tile to the base board to finish their creations.

-- Guide students in attaching parts to the monster faces using leftover clay that was trimmed off to make the tiles.

-- Direct students to use the clay tools to sculpt their monster faces in the tiles, making textures with the wooden pieces.

-- Ask students to write a short report documenting the process of working with clay, and describing what they know about the monster they depicted.

-- Documentation/Assessment:

-- Have students share their artwork with each other.

-- Conduct a peaceful discussion of the lesson, with students assessing themselves on the process of how they made their clay forms and sculptures, and how they depicted the monster that was the subject of their sculpture. 

-- Use accountable talk; backed up by evidence, facts, reasons.

-- Use informal student reflection, and responses to their experimentation with the clay techniques, materials, and processes.

-- Observe students’ work-in-progress.

o Were they able to use their hands to shape the clay?

o Were they able to stretch, press, pull, pinch, poke, roll, flatten, add, and subtract the clay?

o Were they able to make the clay forms that were demonstrated?

o Did they use the clay tools correctly to shape and add texture to the clay?

-- Question students during independent work.

-- Observe class discussions.

-- Review completed work.

-- Ask students:

o How they used their hands.

o What shapes they made.

o The steps in creating their artwork.

o What choices they made.

o If it was difficult to do.

 

Lesson #5 Shadow Puppets

-- Outcomes:

Students will be able to:

-- Imagine and draw a puppet character.

-- Create that character using white pencil on heavy stock black paper.

-- Use artistic language to describe their actions.

-- Make observations about works of art and resource books.

-- Cut out the puppet characters using scissors.

-- Cut the characters into two or more pieces, making joints.

-- Reassemble the characters using hole punchers and metal brads.

-- Attach sticks to the back of the puppets so they can use their hands to make the puppets move.

-- Use their voices and hands to make their puppets "come to life".

-- Perform with their shadow puppets behind a back-lit screen in order to project the image of their puppets on that screen.

-- Work together with other students to create a show with their puppets.

-- Act as an audience for their fellow puppeteers.

Students will understand:

-- Art can be used in fun applications for entertainment purposes.

-- Artists use practiced techniques and tools to create puppets.

-- Artists, at times, disassemble and reassemble their art in order to finish their creations.

-- Artists collaborate to make art.

-- Artists may base their visual art on other sources, such as a story, a play, a piece of music, or a dance.

-- Artists can use their voices and body movements to animate their artwork.

-- Artists can perform in front of an audience.

-- It is important for artists to be appreciative audiences for other artists.

-- Questions:

-- How can we use a character from a story, play, musical piece, or our imagination,to create a puppet?

-- How can we create a puppet from art materials?

-- How do we give a puppet a personality and expressiveness?

-- How do we make a puppet move?

-- How do we give a puppet a voice?

-- How do we create a puppet show?

-- What do we need to do and consider in order to perform with our puppets in front of an audience?

-- Activities:

-- Ask students to choose or create a character from their imagination, or from another media source, to use as a basis for a puppet.

-- Direct students to sketch, on white paper, the character they are going to make into a shadow puppet, keeping in mind any features of the characters that will help identify them.

-- Ask students to redraw their shadow puppet character on the heavy black construction paper using a white pencil.

-- Direct students to use their scissors to carefully cut out their shadow puppet character.

-- Have the students disassemble the movable parts of the puppet by using a scissors to cut them from the puppet’s body.

-- Instruct the students to reattach those parts to the puppet’s body using the hole puncher, and metal brads as fasteners.

-- The hole puncher may also be used to create eye holes or other holes for decorative or utilitarian purposes.

-- Students will attach the wooden sticks to the back of their puppets’ movable parts with tape.

-- Help students in practicing their characters’ sounds or voices, movements, and positions between the light and the shadow puppet screen.

-- Direct students to take part in the shadow puppet exercise, performing movements and voices in conjunction with the narration of a story created for the performance, or a pre-existing story.

-- Possibly play background music that coordinates with the story and performance.

-- Aid students in their characters’ sounds or voices, movements, and positions in front of the light, and behind the shadow puppet screen.

-- Ask students to write a short report documenting the process of creating their puppet, and describing what they know about the puppet character they depicted.

-- Documentation/Assessment:

-- The puppet show is the culmination of the puppetry lesson.

-- Conduct a peaceful discussion of the lesson, with students assessing themselves on the process of how they made their puppets, and how they created their performances for the puppet show.

-- Use accountable talk; backed up by evidence, facts, reasons.

-- Use informal student reflection, and responses to their experimentation with the puppetry techniques, materials, and processes.

-- Observe students’ work-in-progress.

o Were they able to create a character?

o Were they able to make that character into a shadow puppet?

o Were they able to make the puppet move and give it a voice?

o Did they perform in front of the class with the puppet?

-- Question students during independent work.

-- Observe class discussions.

-- Review completed work.

-- Ask students:

o How they chose their character.

o What they did to make their puppet.

o How they gave their puppet a voice and a personality.

o What actions they took to make their puppet perform.

o If it was difficult to do.

Tel: 718-720-6142
 
 
122 Slosson Avenue
2nd Floor
Staten Island, NY 10314

  Member/Employee: 
 
Studio in a School
Sundog Theatre
The Staten Island Children's Museum
The Center for Arts Education 
               Staten Island Arts                 
                

Copyright Ronald Chironna 1978-2016. The images and content of this web site are copyrighted, with all rights reserved to Ronald Chironna. Copying or distributing the material on this web site without prior written permission is strictly prohibited.

For my friends at Studio in a School, the Community Word Project, The Staten Island Teaching Artist Institute, Sundog Theatre, Staten Island Arts, SMB Studio Arts, The Center for Arts Education, Marquis Studios, The Staten Island Children's Museum, and all the schools and institutions in which I've been fortunate enough to work.